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Author Topic: Feeding tips - from Johnny King  (Read 2410 times)

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Boegie

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Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« on: May 24, 2016, 01:02:50 PM »
SWEET POTATOES

If you are not feeding Sweet potatoes why not?
Cooked sweet potatoes are a very cheap food for your parrots
They have to be cooked as they contain an enzyme inhibitor.

Here is how we do it:
We buy seconds from a packing shed. Put in freezer for a couple of days. Then we unfreeze and chop up into pieces half the size of your little finger. Reason for freezing first.....easier to cut up and quicker to cook. Put in large pot, add boiling water and cook on slow heat for 1/2 hour. We then strain the potatoes and use the hot water for the next lot. Once the potatoes are cool we put them in containers and freeze.

More tips can be seen on https://www.facebook.com/Johnnys-Parrot-TIPS-350512538363706/?__mref=message_bubble

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2016, 01:05:37 PM »
CALCIUM CALCIUM CALCIUM - Johnny King

Many bird owners don't feed calcium and some feed either cuttle fish, calcium blocks or liquid calcium.

Not feeding any calcium causes many problems like egg binding, weak bones, thin egg shells, poor feathers and many other problems.

Some birds will not eat cuttle fish or calcium blacks. This means you have no idea what the intake is. The same goes for liquid calcium. Birds are very smart and some will drink the dew drops on the wire to avoid drinking your calcium enriched water.
We add one desert spoon of Calcium Carbonate to a 10 lt bucket of seed, well mixed. This will coat the seed and every time a bird turns over seed to find the place to crack it will take in a certain amount of Calcium.

For Calcium to be metabolized it needs Vitamin D which the bird gets from at least 15 minutes of sunshine. If you can't supply this you will have to give vitamin D as a supplement or install broad Spectrum also called wide spectrum lights. These lights produce artificial sunlight.

More tips can be seen on: https://www.facebook.com/Johnnys-Parrot-TIPS-350512538363706/?__mref=message_bubble

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2016, 01:06:55 PM »
WHITE BREAD FOR YOUR PARROTS - - Johnny King

Here are some facts about white bread.
We know that there are many people round the world who enjoy feeding white bread to their bird. But today, I would like to give you some facts that may shock and surprise you. It's not only that white bread isn't good for health, it can actually be a real danger to health!

Why is the color of white bread so white when the flour taken from wheat is not?
It's because the flour used to make white bread is chemically bleached, just like you bleach your clothes. When you are eating white bread, you are also eating residual chemical bleach . Flour mills use different chemical bleaches, all of which are pretty bad.
Here are a few of them: Oxide of nitrogen, chlorine, chloride, nitrosyl and benzoyl peroxide mixed with various chemical salts.
One bleaching agent, chloride oxide, combined with whatever proteins are still left in the flour, produces alloxan. Alloxon is a poison and has been used to produce diabetes in laboratory animals.

Chlorine oxide destroys the vital wheat germ oil. It will also shorten the flour's shelf life.

Good Nutrition: You won't find it In white bread In the process of making flour white, half of the good unsaturated fatty acids, that are high in food value, are lost in the milling process alone, and virtually all the vitamin E is lost with the removal of wheat germ and bran.
As a result, the remaining flour in the white bread you buy, contains only poor quality proteins and fattening starch. But that is not the whole story as to the loss of nutrients.

Here are some other statistics about the huge loss of nutrients when white bread is made:
About 50% of all calcium is lost
70% of phosphorus
80% of iron
98% of magnesium
75% of manganese
50% of potassium and
65% of of copper is destroyed when white bread is made.
80% of thiamin, 60% of riboflavin, 75% of niacin, 50% of pantothenic acid.
About 50% of Pyridoxine is also lost.

Scientific study has confirmed what the swiss have known for years these horrific numbers are the results of a study run by the university of california, college of agriculture. It is obvious, from what we have learned, that white bread should be avoided.

Whole wheat, rye and grain breads made with whole wheat flour are a better way.

More tips can be seen on: https://www.facebook.com/Johnnys-Parrot-TIPS-350512538363706/?__mref=message_bubble

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2016, 01:07:55 PM »
CARROTS  - Johnny King

When we put carrots through the juicer we feed the pulp to the parrots and either drink the juice ourselves or add some to the Lori Drink. We make up a Smoothy for the Lories every early afternoon containing Scotch finger biscuits, dextrose, apple pure, multi vitamin juice, calcium and Insectapro. The pure varies depending on the available fruit.

More tips can be seen on: https://www.facebook.com/Johnnys-Parrot-TIPS-350512538363706/?__mref=message_bubble

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2016, 01:10:46 PM »
MUNG BEAN SPROUTS - Johnny King

160 grams of mung beans made 670 grams of Sprouts, enough to feed 70 birds ranging from Quakers to Macaws. Total cost Aus 32 cents. Living plants.... The best Food.

More tips can be seen on: https://www.facebook.com/Johnnys-Parrot-TIPS-350512538363706/?__mref=message_bubble

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2016, 01:12:05 PM »
SOYA BEANS - Johnny King

There is more and more disturbing data found about soy beans and products. Soy beans in their natural state contain large quantities of natural toxins and there is data that soy is cumulatively toxic when fed to animals. For example, The PARROT SOCIETY NEW ZEALAND claims that soy products in bird food have caused such problems as immune system breakdown, failure of organs and multiplication of the birds' own benign bacteria. Unquote

There is also evidence that feeding soya beans stops birds from breeding.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2016, 01:13:20 PM »
SEEDS NOT TO SPROUT.....TOXIC - Johnny King

Anasazi, Black, Fava, Kidney, Lima, Navy, Pinto and Soy

These sprouts can cause digestive problems and even death because of their toxicity.
Before experimenting with unknown parrot diet please do thorough research by experts.

and

BEAN SPROUTS

The only beans you should ever sprout are adzuki, mung, and garbanzo. Any other bean should be cooked.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2016, 01:14:37 PM »
HOT HOT CHILLIES FOR PARROTS - Johnny King

Parrots seem to be able to eat hot peppers with impunity. Why is it so?
A songbird has about 50 taste buds, a parrot about 350 and a human about 9000. The "Hot" sensors are missing in the parrot tongue. This is the reason why parrots can eat hot chillies and enjoy them. They are an excellent source of Vitamin A, C, K and Antioxidants.
One question remains. What about the next day when the parrot has a poo? Not sure about this I asked my world famous Quaker Cuddles. He informed me that the day after eating very hot chillies it felt like someone put a blow torch under him.

There is a Myth which says that hot chillies get rid of worms in parrots. Wrong Wrong Wrong. It just makes hot worms.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2016, 01:16:17 PM »
Treat for the Fids today - Johnny King

Plain Popcorn....no sugar, no butter, no salt

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2016, 01:18:09 PM »
From Johnny King's Facebook page:

Freshly cooked corn and Sweet Potato stored in cut off bottles ready for the freezer.

We also freeze apple pure, bananas for lories smoothy, grapes, sugar cane, cooked rice, pumpkin, squash, passion fruit, and whatever is in season and cheap. We have 3 bird freezers and 2 bird fridges

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2016, 01:19:48 PM »
BIRD TREAT - Johnny King

* Grind whole grain barley in coffee grinder..stop before it turns into flour.
* Put in microwave dish
* Add I heaped teaspoon of calcium carbonate (from produce store)
* Add 2 heaped tablespoons of dextrose (from home brew shop or supermarket)
* Add boiling water and stir to consistency of porridge
* Microwave on high for 5 minutes
*Take out a few days supply and put in fridge .....freeze the rest in daily containers.

We feed a level teaspoon per small pair of birds like Caiques. African Greys 2 teaspoons

Adjust ingredients as you see fit

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2016, 01:20:31 PM »
Apple Pure - Johnny King

Apart from other goodies we use apple pure in Smoothies for our lories. Here is how we make it.

1 wash apples thoroughly
2 cut into small pieces
3 remove pips (they contain cyanide)
4 place pieces in food processor
5 add some water
6 process until pure
7 place in containers and freeze surplus

No cooking needed
Put some on ice cream for yourself

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2016, 01:22:07 PM »
SPROUTS -- THE BENEFITS AND HOW TO - Johnny King

Unfortunately this excellent food for birds is not fed by many bird owners for various reasons like laziness, not knowing how to or past failures.

Nutritionally, Sprouts have high Vitamin A, B-Complex and Vitamin C. Minerals like iron, phosphorus, calcium, sodium and potassium levels are also increased after sprouting. The calorie and carbohydrate content is decreased, Protein content is enhanced and fat levels are almost negligible. Being fiber dense sprouts aid in improved digestion. Sprouting breaks down complex carbohydrates to simple sugars, proteins into amino acids and fats into simple fatty acids. Thus all nutrients are pre-digested and are easily available. Carbohydrate molecules are broken down during sprouting to allow absorption of atmospheric nitrogen and re-forming into amino-acids, enhancing protein quality. Sprouts are also rich in anti-oxidants reducing free radical damage and process of aging. Sprouts have a low Glycemic index**, thus one of the preferred diabetic foods. Being high in fiber and low in cholesterol, sprouts are heart friendly as well. However, owing to its high sodium content, patients with blood pressure should have sprouts in moderation. Saponins from sprouts increase the activity of T-lymphocytes and interferons, thus boosting the body's defense mechanism. Sunflower seed loses its oil in the germinating process hence sunflower seed can be fed to bird without fear of a diet high in fat Sprouts as daily vegetable diet, are still superior to other antioxidant foods.

HOW TO SPROUT SEED

Rule number one CLEANLINESS Rule number 2 CLEANLINESS

Any seed fit for human consumption and viable germination is suitable for sprouting
BUT only certain seeds are recommended for Birds
Mung Beans -- Azuki Beans -- Garbanzo Beans (also Called Chickpeas) -- Wheat -- Barley --- Sunflower

What do you need apart from the seed?
Any container will do --- container must have some air holes
When germinating for the first time use small quantity of seed -- a little seed makes a lot of sprouts

We cut part of the flat side of a plastic 2 lt juice bottle - (hole about the size of the label) We then drill several holes in the lid to form the strainer
Then we cut another bottle in half and remove the neck
This will make the lid (SEE PIC)

You need about 3 containers per type of seed

Day 1: Put seed in container - (About 30 grams) Use hand sprayer to spray seed with 10% solution of Bleach -- (this will kill any Fungi) -- leave for about 5 minutes ---- rinse thoroughly and fill with water and leave for 24 hours -

Day2: Drain water and rinse until water is clear --- drain -- -- rinse at least one more time during the day (like evening) and DRAIN

Day 3: Seed should have little tails -- Rinse until water is clear-- Smell sprouts ---- If it smells it is off -- DO NOT FEED --- feed to birds and put the remainder in fridge -- DO NOT keep refrigerated sprouts for more than 3 days and rinse before feeding

NOTE: Large seeds like corn and peas may have to be soaked fully submerged for 2 days -

*** Spray empty containers with bleach and then wash thoroughly
*** It is better to germinate each type of seed separately
*** You can allow sprouts to grow for another day if you wish
*** Minimum temperature for germination is 5 degrees celcius

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2016, 01:23:00 PM »
SEED BELLS - Johnny King

Jim van Reyk

Ingredients:
 1. Seed of your choice or seed mix of your choice.
 2. Plain flour.
 3. A bit of honey. And
 4. Water.
 5. Suitable molds eg: plastic disposable drink cups.

Method:
 1. Mix a cup full of sifted flour with water until you have a watery compound.
 2. Place on Stove and Gently raise heat to a simmer, stirring the mix until it changes to a pearly color, then remove from the stove.
 3. Add three or four tablespoons of Honey and blend.
 4. Add birdseed or seed mix until a very thick slurry is reached.
 5. Pour/spoon into the mold of your choice.
 6. Poke in a suitable length of Gal wire that has a hook at one end (the end that goes into the mix).
 7. When the mix hardens, a day or two, remove from the mold and hang in the cage or aviary.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2016, 01:23:51 PM »
DO BIRDS HAVE TASTE BUDS? - by Johnny King

Yes, but not many. Parrots' taste buds are found in the back of their throats and on their tongues and, like ours, can distinguish sweet, sour, bitter and salt. But whereas humans have about 9000 taste buds, parrots have only about 350 --- A domestic pigeon has 27-59 --- A Rabbit has about 17,000.
 Many birds need to be able to taste bitter so as to avoid poisonous foods, but only a few can taste sweetness.

The tastes perceptible to us are sweet, sour, bitter and salt. Only birds that feed on fruit or nectar, like parrots and hummingbirds, show any interest in sweet tastes. Sour is widely tolerated by birds. Salt tolerance varies.
 Seabirds can excrete excess salt through their nasal glands, but will prefer fresh water to salt water if given a choice. Bitter, a taste often associated with poisons gets a variety of responses.

We feed our parrots bird eye chillies ( the hot ones ) -- They can't taste the hotness -- Some lories are not too keen on them -- I have always wondered if they can feel it the next day when they have a poop --