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Author Topic: Feeding tips - from Johnny King  (Read 2409 times)

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Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2016, 01:24:46 PM »
CROP PUNCTURES - by Johnny King

Crop or Tube feeding in Australia is mainly used to speed up feeding time when hand rearing babies. It has sometimes been referred to as Factory Production style feeding.

Most Baby birds are fed by syringe or spoon. This type of feeding encourages the bird's feeding reflex.

Crop punctures are normally caused by either carelessness or inexperience in tube feeding. Tube feeding ( crop feeding) is a method of feeding, in which, the food is pumped into the crop through a tube that has been put down the esophagus and into the crop. If the tube is pushed too far, or if the baby jumps, the tube may be pushed through through the crop membrane and the  outer skin to cause a puncture. If this happens, food put into the crop will leak out of the puncture. The only way to correct this problem is to suture the inner and outer layers of the crop and skin. Antibiotics must be administered to prevent infection. If left uncorrected, infection will set in, and the baby will starve to death because the crop will no longer hold food.

Tube or crop feeding feeding should be used only as a last resort for babies that will not swallow food without choking and coughing. For this type of baby, this method of feeding will prevent aspiration (Aspiration is defined as the inhalation of either oropharyngeal or gastric contents into the lower airways; that is, the act of taking foreign material into the lungs) , but obviously, it may cause other problems. Except in emergency situations, tube feeding should be done only by the experienced hand feeder.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2016, 01:25:43 PM »
SCRAMBLED EGGS FOR BIRDS - Johnny King

My birds LOVE scrambled eggs. While there is fat in eggs themselves, it's only around five grams --- And more than half of that is unsaturated, the good type that actually helps counterbalance cholesterol's artery clogging effects.

The message is not only are eggs not 'bad' for birds, they're nutritious - packed with protein, vitamins and antioxidants --- They're actually one of the rare food sources of vitamin D, something many birds are lacking --

 You can put TONS of healthy foods into scrambled eggs to get your bird to try new things --
Some foods you can add to scrambled eggs:

Peppers ------- Silver Beet ------ Corn ----- Rice ----- Lentils --- Peas
 Nuts (sparingly) ----- Seeds
 Any other fresh veggies/fruit that are non-toxic to parrots

I scramble the eggs in a bowl and cook in the microwave for 2 minutes -- then I cut the egg up into small pieces about 10mm square

NOTE: Only give quantity which can be eaten in an hour or two -- discard any leftovers --
 Feed only twice a week

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2016, 01:26:45 PM »
HOW TO SPROUT SEED - Johnny King

Rule number one CLEANLINESS
 Rule number 2 CLEANLINESS

Any seed for for human consumption is suitable to sprout

Day 1:
 Put seed in suitable container (example see Johnny's Tips August 2012) --
Option: Spray seed with 10% solution of Bleach -- (this will kill any Fungi) --
leave for about 5 minutes ---- rinse and fill with water and leave for 24 hours --
When germinating for the first time use small quantity of seed -- a little makes a lot

Day2:
 Drain water and rinse until water is clear --- drain -- container must have some air holes --
 rinse at least one more time during the day (like evening)

Day 3:
 Seed should have little tails --
 Rinse until water is clear-- Smell sprouts ---- If it smells it is off -- DO NOT FEED ---
 feed to birds and put the remainder in fridge -- if too much freeze some --
 DO NOT keep refrigerated sprouts for more than 3 days and rinse before feeding

NOTE: Large seeds like corn and peas may have to be soaked fully submerged for 2 days --
 *** Wash empty containers thorougly

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2016, 06:35:29 PM »
Sweet Potato Muffins - by Johnny King

Ingredients:

1 cup white flour
 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
 1 tablespoon baking powder
 1 tablespoon brown sugar
 1/2 cup chopped nuts
 1/2 cup sultanas or chopped prunes
 2 eggs
 3/4 cups apple juice
 1 cup cooked and mashed sweet potato
 1/4 cup melted butter

How To:

Mix the ingredients together -- Crush eggshells to almost a powder with pestle and mortar or back of a spoon --
 Mix shell grit in -- put mixture into greased muffin tins -- Bake at 220 degrees Celsius for about 25 minutes or until
 still a little bit soft
 --- whilst waiting for the muffins to cool make a cuppa -- then give one muffin to your bird and eat one yourself --
 You can freeze the muffins in small zip lock bags

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #19 on: May 24, 2016, 06:37:03 PM »
WEEVILS. MOTHS. BEATLES. GRUBS - by Johnny King

Most grain purchased contains Weevil eggs which are virtually impossible to see with the naked eye.

We put all our seed and nuts through the freezer for 48 hours. This kills the weevils and eggs. If your freezer is small fill a 2 lt plastic bottle or other container and freeze for 24 hours. Then empty content into plastic container with lid ,,, like a bucket. And repeat the process of freezing another container.

Flower purchased from the supermarket may also contain the eggs. Freeze for 24 hours.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #20 on: May 24, 2016, 06:38:09 PM »
NO SEED FOR LORIES AND LORIKEETS - by Johnny King

many times I have come across people who feed their lories or lorikeets seed especially Sunflower seeds. This will kill the parrot or at least shorten their life.

Lories and lorikeets are fruit, vegetables and nectar eaters with the occasional insect.

Fruit and vegetables are fed the same as for most parrots and the nectar is either given with a purchased Lori mix or home made.

Here is a recipe for a home made Lori or lorikeet wet mix

HOW TO MAKE LORI OR LORIKEET DRINK

4 scotch finger biscuits
 1 level teaspoon calcium carbonate
 4 teaspoons dextrose from home brew shop or supermarket in brew section
 Add 2 cups of boiling water and mix with bamix type hand mixer
 When properly mixed like cream add 2 cups fruit juice...NOT ORANGE JUICE.
 Add 1 cup Apple pure. Blend and then add cold water to make 1 1/2 liter total

Apple pure can be substituted for other fruit pure.

Feed app 200ml per pair of birds. If anything is left keep in fridge. If you want to make a lot at the one time you can freeze it in daily rations.

NOTE: This drink is in ADDITION TO FRUIT, VEGETABLES, PASTA, RICE AND SPROUTS

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2016, 06:40:05 PM »
Great vegetable for Birds by Johnny King

Wombok

an Asian vegetable, also known as Chinese cabbage, Celery cabbage, Napa cabbage, Tientsin cabbage, wong nga bok.
Womboks are known to have been cultivated in China since the 5th Century and remain one of the most popular vegetables in Asia.
It does not taste like cabbage. It is very nutritious for your feathered friends. You get a lot of weight for your money.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #22 on: May 24, 2016, 06:40:58 PM »
SPROUTS - by Johnny King

Unfortunately this excellent food for birds is not fed by many bird owners for various reasons--

Nutritionally, Sprouts have high Vitamin A, B-Complex and Vitamin C. Minerals like iron, phosphorus, calcium, sodium and potassium levels are also increased after sprouting. The calorie and carbohydrate content is decreased, Protein content is enhanced and fat levels are almost negligible.

Being fiber dense sprouts aid in improved digestion.
 Sprouting breaks down complex carbohydrates to simple sugars, proteins into amino acids and fats into simple fatty acids. Thus all nutrients are pre-digested and are easily available.
 Carbohydrate molecules are broken down during sprouting to allow absorption of atmospheric nitrogen and re-forming into amino-acids, enhancing protein quality.

Sprouts are also rich in anti-oxidants reducing free radical damage and process of aging. Sprouts have a low Glycemic index**, thus one of the preferred diabetic foods. Being high in fiber and low in cholesterol, sprouts are heart friendly as well.
 However, owing to its high sodium content, patients with blood pressure should have sprouts in moderation.

Saponins from sprouts increase the activity of T-lymphocytes and interferons, thus boosting the body's defense mechanism.

Sunflower seed loses its oil in the germinating process hence sunflower seed can be fed to bird without fear of a diet high in fat
 Sprouts as daily vegetable diet, are still superior to other antioxidant foods.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #23 on: May 24, 2016, 06:43:47 PM »
FREE WATER DISH - by Johnny King

Cut the front and back out of a bottle and leave about 75mm or 3 inches at the bottom. Drill two holes through the top of the bottle, insert wire, tie off and make a hook at the end of the wire. Hang the bottle in a place the birds can reach.

Make sure both sides are cut to avoid a bird getting trapped.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #24 on: May 24, 2016, 06:45:38 PM »
SEEDS - by Johnny King

Many aviculturists who became concerned when pellet manufacturers warned against feeding seeds to parrots discovered that when seeds were removed from the diet of their breeder birds, production plummeted. As long as seeds do not comprise over twenty-five percent of the diet, they contribute valuable nutrients and satisfy the need of parrots to work for their food. Besides protein, many seeds contain vitamins A, B, D, and E, calcium, phosphorus, and the desirable unsaturated fatty acids so necessary to the health of feathers, beak and skin.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #25 on: May 24, 2016, 06:46:24 PM »
APPLE PIPS THE KILLER - by Johnny King

Apple seeds contain a substance called amygdalin that can release cyanide under the right circumstances such as contact with digestive enzymes. The cyanide is linked to sugars in the form of a cyanogenic glycoside and these cyanide-releasing compounds are remarkably common in nature. They also crop up in stone fruits like plums, peaches, apricots, and famously, bitter almonds. You need about 1 milligram of cyanide per kilo of body weight to kill a human being. Apple seeds contain about 700 milligrams of cyanide per kilo, so about 100 grams of apple seeds should be enough to dispatch a 70-kg adult human.

The Avery Cockatiel weighs about 75 grams and an adult male around 75 kg. This gives a ratio of 1000:1
 This means that 1/10th of a gram ingested could kill a cockatiel.

Many bird owners claim that they have been feeding apple pips for many years without any deaths. Unfortunately the same owners have never or rarely had an autopsy done on a deceased bird.

WHY TAKE THE CHANCE.

Boegie

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Re: Feeding tips - from Johnny King
« Reply #26 on: June 30, 2016, 12:01:48 PM »
HOW TO KILL WEEVILS, BEATLES, EGGS, GRUBS AND MOTHS

Easy. Put all seed through freezer for 48 hours. This will kill all weevil eggs as well as the grubs, beatles and moths. If you have a small freezer fill 2 lt bottle with seed. Freeze for 48 hours. Then tip into plastic container. Repeat the process until all seed has gone through freezer.

You are now a successful PEST KILLER