Blue-fronted and Red-lored Amazon mutations

Rare mutations in Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) and Red-lored Amazon (Amazona autumnalis).
By: Dr. med. vet. Friedrich Janeczek

The World Wide Birds Magazine has featured interesting mutations in various parakeets and conures in several issues. In this blog post, I would like to introduce the readers of World Wide Birds Magazine to four rare amazon mutations.

1 – Blue and Turquoise mutations in Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva)

Both mutations are recessive, i.e. there are split birds of both sexes. Both mutations are descended from one colored bird which naturally occurred. Experienced breeders have succeeded in propagating these mutations through breeding skills and pairing them with unrelated, normal-colored birds. The blue mutation has smooth plumage.

young blue Blue-fronted Amazon
Young blue Blue-fronted Amazon
young blue Blue-fronted Amazon
Young blue Blue-fronted Amazon

The plumage of Turquoise Blue-fronted Amazons is of a darker color than in the blue mutation and typically slightly shaggy.

maturing Turquoise Blue-fronted Amazon
Maturing Turquoise Blue-fronted Amazon
maturing Turquoise Blue-fronted Amazon
Maturing Turquoise Blue-fronted Amazon

By my estimates, both mutations are extremely rare worldwide with fewer than 20 color birds per mutation.

2 – Lutino and cinnamon-lutino mutations

Both mutations are sex-linked, i.e. only males are split. Lutino Red-lored Amazons have no melanin in their plumage and their plumage is pure yellow in color.

lutino Red-lored amazon female paired with normal colored male
Lutino Red-lored amazon female paired with normal colored male

The cinnamon-lutino mutation has melanin in their plumage that is reduced to varying degrees from specimen to specimen. This leads to a very beautiful color drawing on the wings and tail feathers. Because of this color variation, the cinnamon-lutino mutation has specimens that are almost as yellow as the lutino Red-lored Amazon and birds with plumage that is almost bronze.

The red coloring typical for this amazon species remains unchanged in both mutations and gives a nice contrast to the different shades of yellow in the mutation birds.

mature male cinnamon-lutino mature female lutino Red-lored amazon
Left mature male cinnamon-lutino, right mature female lutino Red-lored amazons

According to my estimates, there are less than 50 colored birds per mutation of both mutations worldwide. Although they are somewhat more common than the above-mentioned mutations in the Blue-fronted Amazons, they are still very rare. However, most existing visual color birds are females because of the sex-linked inheritance. Lutino and cinnamon lutino males make up less than 20% of the current colored bird population. This also explains the price of the males, which is twice as high as one of the females.

maturing male cinnamon-lutino Red-lored amazon
Maturing male cinnamon-lutino Red-lored amazon
maturing females cinnamon-lutino Red-lored amazons
Maturing females cinnamon-lutino Red-lored amazons

World Wide Birds Magazine readers with a serious interest in the featured amazon mutations described may contact:
Dr. med. vet. Friedrich Janeczek
(info@janeczek.com)

Amazon book available:

If you found this blog post, Blue-fronted and Red-lored Amazon mutations, helpful, you might also like:

https://www.wwbirds.co.za/dir/parrot-hand-rearing/

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